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Siemens Answers – Dairy Process Automation

 

Milk Made

Milk is an inseparable ingredient of an average Indian’s diet. For most Indians, the day starts with the morning tea laced with milk. In many urban neighbourhoods, queues form at select spots where milk vans unload crates of milk sachets before day breaks. Few sweets or desserts in India are made without milk. Much of the vegetarian Indian population depend on milk and milk derivatives such as butter, cheese, yoghurt, curd, paneer, lassi, clarified butter (ghee) and ice cream for their daily intake of protein, calcium, vitamins and minerals.

It is no wonder that India is the biggest consumer of milk in the world. In 2012, nearly 128 million tonnes of milk was consumed in India. The rising demand for fresh and packaged dairy products and ethnic dairy specialties is broadening the base of India’s modern dairy sector, which accounts for almost 17 % of India’s expenditure on food. Demand for milk is expected to increase to 155 million tonnes by 2016-17 and 200 million tonnes by 2021-22.

Working hard to meet this demand are the thousands of milk farmers / producers and milk of India. While close to 80 percent of these milk farmers are located in the interiors of India, the biggest markets for milk exist in towns and cities.

Till the 1970s, milk preservation and processing facilities in villages were either absent or limited by capacity constraints, and considerable amount of milk was wasted. This in turn resulted in possible loss of income for milk farmers. Then came the white revolution brought on by Operation Flood, often regarded as one of the world’s largest rural development programs and credited with making India one of the world’s largest producers of milk.

Milk is an inseparable ingredient of an average Indian’s diet. For most Indians, the day starts with the morning tea laced with milk. In many urban neighbourhoods, queues form at select spots where milk vans unload crates of milk sachets before day breaks. Few sweets or desserts in India are made without milk. Much of the vegetarian Indian population depend on milk and milk derivatives such as butter, cheese, yoghurt, curd, paneer, lassi, clarified butter (ghee) and ice cream for their daily intake of protein, calcium, vitamins and minerals.

Bringing the farmers under the organized sector of the milk cooperatives has helped standardize milk production in the country and greatly improved the quality of milk that reach our homes. Access to bulk milk coolers and milk processing technologies that convert milk into other dairy products with a longer shelf life have not only reduced losses due to the perish-ability of milk but also opened up new markets for surplus milk production.

Siemens Dairy Process Solutions

Over the years, Siemens has been a partner to the white revolution that has transformed India. Its wide range of sustainable technologies has helped dairy plants, milk processing units and milk cooperatives build capacities, improve quality and help meet the rising demand of milk in India. In turn, it has helped the cooperatives sustain the incomes of milk farmers across the country. The dairies could now transfer benefits from reduced operating costs, more consistent product quality, and flexible expansion capabilities to both the consumers and its legion of suppliers.

Siemens has been the backbone of the Indian dairy industry through its automation systems that are widely used for dairy processing across the country. This mainly involves the production of packaged milk, milk powder, ice cream and other milk based products.

The SIMATIC PCS 7 process control system provides advanced engineering tools for dairies and cheese makers with the Advanced Process Functions (APF) engineering tool and the Dairy Functional Toolset tailored specifically to dairy operations. The main steps controlled by the PCS 7 system are safe material transfer, reliable tank management, traceable material movements, and consistent product specifications. Online instrumentation and powerful pump drives ensure that the correct quantity and quality of material are provided at each process; be it cleaning and separating skimmed milk and cream, setting the fat content, pasteurization, homogenization, sterilization, or cooling.

Siemens has been the backbone of the Indian dairy industry through its automation systems that are widely used for dairy processing across the country. This mainly involves the production of packaged milk, milk powder, ice cream and other milk based products.

The SIMATIC PCS7 enables Siemens to provide answers to revolutionize the dairy industry and meet the rising demand for dairy products across the country.